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Sixteen states are filing a lawsuit against the United States regarding their prohibited authorization of liquefied natural gas exports.
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Sixteen states are filing a lawsuit against the United States regarding their prohibited authorization of liquefied natural gas exports.

The attorney general of Texas, Ken Paxton, announced on Thursday that a total of sixteen states in the US, such as Florida, Louisiana, and Texas itself, are taking legal action against the federal government’s restriction on approving liquefied natural gas export applications.

The legal case asserts that the national government does not have the power to fully reject those licenses.

In January, Joe Biden announced that the halt would give officials the chance to evaluate how they assess the potential economic and environmental consequences of proposals to export LNG (liquefied natural gas) to Europe and Asia, where there is a significant demand for the resource.

According to specialists, the temporary halt may jeopardize the development of several gas export facilities that were proposed for the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. This has raised significant worries among environmental organizations and members of the local community.

A study found that if all planned LNG projects were to proceed and export gas, it would produce 3.2 billion tons of greenhouse gases, which is equal to the emissions of the entire European Union.

In January, when announcing the pause, Biden stated that the halting of new LNG approvals recognizes the climate crisis as the most critical threat of our era.

A legal complaint was submitted to the United States district court in Lake Charles, Louisiana, alleging that the pause by the US Department of Energy will negatively impact the economy and hinder the provision of consistent supplies of LNG to European allies, who are attempting to reduce their dependence on pipeline gas from Russia.

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The report was contributed by Reuters.

Source: theguardian.com