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Cop28: Rishi Sunak says ‘climate politics is close to breaking point’ – as it happened


Harming charitable organizations focused on environmental causes.

According to him, the state of climate politics is nearing a critical juncture. He also stated that the consequences of not taking action are unacceptable, but we still have the power to determine our actions.

Sunak stated that achieving net zero would only be achieved in a manner that is advantageous to the citizens of Britain. He also mentioned that they have eliminated proposals for heat pumps and energy efficiency, which would have resulted in significant expenses for individuals.

He also emphasized his recently proposed environmental strategy, which has received negative reviews from critics.

However, he did inform other nations that the increasing scientific evidence of climate-related disasters indicates that we are not taking sufficient action quickly enough. He also emphasized that there is room for improvement from everyone.

He urged major polluters to accelerate their reductions and declared that “the United Kingdom is at the forefront of this effort.”

Starmer accused Rishi Sunak of avoiding taking a leadership role on the global stage at Cop28 and addressing the urgent issue of climate change. He also mentioned that he has received numerous requests for meetings, more than they can handle. Starmer emphasized that the prime minister’s focus should not be on what he says, but rather on what actions he takes, as they will ultimately be judged by future generations. Starmer criticized the prime minister for downplaying the importance of this issue and for his small-minded approach to politics, citing examples of his comments about the Greek prime minister and ‘eco zealots’. He asserted that this is not a matter to shy away from or retreat from.

  • Sunak announced at the summit that he had weakened the UK’s climate policy, causing frustration among political figures and climate specialists who believe he misinterpreted the situation.

  • Leaders from developing nations, especially those most affected by the climate crisis, urged powerful economies and polluters to promptly address the issue by decreasing emissions and providing financial support for loss and damage.

  • According to a report from the United Nations, droughts have been identified as a worldwide crisis leading to widespread hunger and are often overlooked as a deadly threat.

  • Brazil’s president, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, said it was not possible to tackle the climate crisis without also tackling inequality. He spoke of climate suffering in the Amazon, which was experiencing one of the “most tragic droughts in its history”, while cyclones in the south of Brazil had left a trail of “destruction and death”.

  • The citizens of Greece were delighted when King Charles donned a tie and pocket square with a Greek design during his speech at the conference. This has been seen as a signal of his endorsement for the return of the Parthenon marbles to Athens, following a dispute over the ancient artifacts this week.

  • The monarch, Charles, delivered a speech that was better received than Sunak’s. He expressed concern about the alarming tipping points being reached and the world’s failure to address the climate crisis. Charles emphasized the need to repair and restore nature’s economy in order to maintain harmony and balance, which is crucial for our own economy and survival.

  • Rishi Sunak was the only one to use the opportunity to brag about rolling back domestic climate policies. A more sensitive leader may have focused on highlighting Britain’s positive actions and encouraging other countries to follow suit instead of reinforcing our setbacks. In my opinion, it is quite shameful and sets a negative example for other nations. Why should developing countries, who are bearing the brunt of our emissions and experiencing extreme weather events, invest in reducing carbon emissions when the British prime minister chose to address Cop with the intention of retreating from net zero policies? It is a risky move to discuss the supposed costs of decarbonisation at a summit where each country is expected to do everything in its power to prevent a climate crisis.

    In September, I wrote a recap of Sunak’s decision to roll back the net zero plan as a reminder of the policies being discussed.

    Rishi Sunak has been criticized for not taking a leading role in addressing the global issue of climate change and for not making efforts to showcase leadership at the Cop28 conference.

    After Sunak’s tense press conference, he proudly discussed the UK’s intentions to weaken efforts for climate action.

    Starmer shared his remarks during the opening day of the Cop28 conference, where he was accompanied by David Lammy, the shadow foreign secretary, and Ed Miliband, the shadow secretary for net zero.

    Starmer stated that he has received a considerable amount of involvement and numerous requests for one-on-one meetings, with an overwhelming number that cannot all be accommodated.

    According to him, the prime minister stated earlier today that our actions and inactions will ultimately be evaluated by our future generations, rather than just our words.

    As a result, the prime minister’s tendency to minimize and simplify this issue highlights the narrow-mindedness of his political approach. We witnessed this with the Greek prime minister and also with his remarks about “eco zealots” as he traveled here. This is not a matter to ignore or back away from.

    During the world leader’s speeches, Rishi Sunak took the stage and stated that climate science indicates we are not on the right path. He also mentioned that the credibility of this science is being weakened by the involvement of politics. Based on his earlier press conference, it seems that this statement is in response to criticism he received for his decision to roll back the net zero goal.

    Rishi Sunak

    Sunak expressed disapproval of the contrast between grand speeches and actual actions on the ground. He highlighted that the UK has decarbonized at a quicker pace than any other major economy.

    The prime minister once again proudly declared on the global platform that he was implementing a fresh strategy towards achieving net zero, while also weakening previous commitments.

    He described the £1.6bn fund that was unveiled today, which will encompass funding for loss and damage as well as assistance for forests. He also stated that the UK is a prominent center for green finance.

    Sunak stated, “I am confident that we can achieve success here in Dubai, but it will require cooperation and collaboration.”

    The British Prime Minister will not be available to participate in the climate discussions, as he is scheduled to depart on his personal aircraft and go back to the United Kingdom after just eight hours in Dubai.

    He also stated that the discussion is too polarized, which may come as a surprise to the climate specialists he has continuously referred to as “fanatics” recently.

    Rishi Sunak was committed to reducing the UK’s emissions.

    The United Kingdom contributes to less than 1% of the world’s emissions. We must recognize that our actions alone will not significantly impact our emissions.

    Nevertheless, some contend that the United Kingdom must set a precedent as a prosperous, advanced nation that has traditionally been among the top polluters globally.

    Sunak emphasized the importance of a “pragmatic and proportionate” approach to achieving net zero, as our emissions only make up less than 1% of the total.

    When asked about his meeting with Tony Blair, Sunak replied, “It was a pleasant experience seeing Tony Blair.”

    When questioned by Politico about his frequent use of a private jet instead of being present at Cop, where he will only be for a short time, he explained that it is not the duration that matters but the influence he can have.

    He stated that he had productive discussions with individuals regarding a necessary overhaul of the worldwide financial system.

    Sunak expressed satisfaction with the productivity of the day.

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    He stated that the state of climate politics is nearing a tipping point. He also emphasized that the consequences of not taking action are unacceptable, but we still have options in how we proceed.

    Sunak stated that achieving net zero would only occur in a manner that is advantageous to the citizens of Britain. He also mentioned that they have eliminated proposals on heat pumps and energy efficiency, which would have resulted in significant expenses for individuals.

    He also emphasized his recent environmental strategy, which has faced criticism from opponents.

    However, he did inform other nations that the increasing scientific evidence of climate-related disasters indicates that we are not taking sufficient action, and emphasized that everyone has the capability to do more.

    He urged major polluters to accelerate their reduction efforts and declared that “the UK is taking the lead.”

    Source: theguardian.com