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According to a scientist, the rate at which the Greenland ice sheet is melting can serve as an indicator for summer weather patterns in Europe.
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According to a scientist, the rate at which the Greenland ice sheet is melting can serve as an indicator for summer weather patterns in Europe.

Although it is known to be challenging, a recent study in the scientific journal Weather and Climate Dynamics proposes that the rate of melting of the Greenland ice sheet may be able to forecast the weather for the upcoming summer in Europe.

The sequence of occurrences is intricate and additional variables may disrupt the outcome. However, based on the research conducted by Dr Marilena Oltmanns from the UK National Oceanography Centre, who is the main contributor of the study, the process can be summarized as follows:

Higher temperatures in Greenland result in an increase of melted glacial water in the Atlantic Ocean. Due to its lower density, this meltwater floats on the surface and decreases the transfer of heat between the air and the ocean. As a result, the winds become more intense near the area of melted glacial water. During winter, these winds cause a shift towards the north in the North Atlantic current, which is a continuation of the Gulf Stream.

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During the upcoming summer season, the prevailing winds will flow in the same direction as the current and ultimately shift towards the north. This pattern contributes to the development of widespread atmospheric circulation, resulting in hotter and less humid conditions in Europe.

According to Oltmanns, the position, size, and intensity of freshwater events have the potential to predict the pattern of warm and dry conditions in Europe.

According to Oltmanns, given the series of occurrences we have identified, we anticipate that the ocean-atmosphere conditions will be conducive to an exceptionally hot and dry summer in southern Europe this year.

Source: theguardian.com